Art is an essential part of humanity that allows us to tell stories about things we have, things we don’t have and things we wish we had in our lives. Writing a story is simply creating a world that can be likely to ours or completely different from reality. In this article, there are eight things to look into when it comes to writing your first story.

1: THE CONCEPT/IDEA OF THE STORY

All stories have to be conceived from something, a story can be born out of real-life experiences or a fantastic-imaginative idea. However a story is born, a good story needs to have its core message where all story events will originate and hook the reader with meaningful and mindful story actions.

A story needs to have a flow of events, which can be either a chronological flow of events or a mixed flow that has backstories popping up in the middle of the story.

2: UNDERSTAND YOUR AUDIENCE

Someone is going to read your story, someone has to read your story, and it won’t be everyone who sees the cover of your book or ebook. People are selective about what they want to read and how much they are willing to pay for the stories they want to read.

Knowing your audience is simply a formal way of telling the author to understand the market portion that will accept his book/story. You can’t skip this part or you will end up having a story without readers who cheer and grow fond of your hard work.

Take time to understand the trends of your ideal story. That way you be confident to produce something that will have a positive acceptance in the industry, and good reviews from readers.

3: PLOT OR OUTLINE YOUR STORY

This is the part where you get to put down on a paper all ideas that have the potential to build up your story. Remember that not everything that you come up with will be the right materials to add to your story. You must filter out things or ideas which won’t work well with the flow of the story and select the few strong that preserve both the tension and climax-impact of your story.

By outlining and plotting your story, you get to discover and understand the number of characters living in your story as well as how they all affect each others’ lives from the beginning to the end of the story.

4: STORY SETTING IS IMPORTANT

“Story and its characeters have one thing in common, a place where everything fits in their place and happens altogether”

Don’t you ever screww up this part or you end up with the worst story in the history of writhing stories figuratively

It might the least thought of part of the story, but a set of your story can hold up your story or drop it dead. There are few things that can affect the setting of your story. They can be things such as;

  • History and Times. A story that bases itself on historical has to get a few details right about history. From the geological locations and names to al the dressing styles and other little details about cultures of people in the areas.
  • Reflection of reality. Things that reflect can be from languages, building architectures of several areas referred to in your story.
  • Government and Politics. What is the ruling structure of people in your story; is the government made up of people only? Or do animals also have a representative in the ruling class? The government of your story set can determine whether you are going to write about a democratic kind of story with democratic political conflicts or is it going to be a monarch king of a story where everyone bows to a king or a queen.
  • Religion and Power of Faith. Do your characters believe in one God or many gods? How is religion affecting the welfare of many? How does religion affect politics? Is religion being used to manipulate societies?

5: BUILD TENSION FROM THE START

There is a saying;

“The first 3 pages are the best”

Readers get hooked by the first 3 pages of the story, don’t wast time with impactless words at the beginning of your story

The tension of the story can be revealed in different forms such as;

  • First love facing competitions from other potential partners.
  • Childtime bullies and Terrible Jokes.
  • Mythical creatures and Aliens.
  • Parables and Serial Killers and many more.

6: CHAPTERS ENDING ON CLIFFHANGERS

Your first chapter can be great, but when your story has about 32 chapters, then, by all means, you need to keep your readers rolling up and down one page after another. And the best way adapted by many writers is ending their chapters on cliffhangers, that way readers are compelled to keep reading through to another chapter.

A cliffhanger is supposed to do the following or cause the following to happen;

  • Steer up the curiosity of readers to continue reading through the entire story.
  • Grab readers’ attention to read down word by word avoid skips of boredom.
  • Maintain the imaginative fantasy readers create in their minds when reading a story.

7: CREATE OBSTACLE TO OVERCOME

A good story has to have conflicts, things or people who create problems for others to overcome and one they do then, we get the hero differentiated from the enemy or enemies. A story without obstacles is never alive and unappealing to any sort of reader.

Obstacles cause a need for a hero and also cause readers to feel sympathy and empathy for the characters of the story.

8: FIVE WAYS TO END YOUR STORY

A story can end in a number of ways, and here are some few ideal ways to end your story;

  • The Moral Ending. This is an ending whereby you the character’s growth throughout the novel and see how far they have come.
  • The Capturing Emotional Ending. This typical ending leaves the reader very emotional, whether that be happy or sad for the character and the story.
  • The Question Ending. This kind of ending leaves the reader with more questions than satisfaction. Keeping them to wonder about what may come t happen next in the story, or what will be the fate of their favorite character?
  • The Suprise Ending. This is when the story takes a turn and takes us to a place where we least expect. For example, A hero turns into the arch-villain or the Villain turns to a Hero.
  • The Image Ending. In this way, a story ends by putting to good use the “show don’t tell” rule and gives a better description of the scene.

I hope this article was helpful, in the case of any questions, ideas or comments, then feel free to use the comment section below and let me know what your thoughts are about this article or anything else. Also, remember to share this article with others to help them get the best of this knowledge.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here